Cover Verse: Dare to be your truest self. answer your heart's desires. unlock the dreams within you. grace the world with your talents. have faith in your own strength. take risks for what you love. embrace your unique place in the world. recognize how amazing you are. Inside Verse: Whatever you dream and wherever you go, you're going to be great. Because you already are. Happy Birthday with Love
As co-owners of The Land of Lost Content, the world’s largest archive of 20th Century popular culture, we’re always thinking of new, exciting ways to make Britain’s rich cultural heritage relevant to the modern consumer. Our greeting card collection with Hallmark does exactly that, and features images from the 50s, 60s and 70s in a 12-part collection.
Find birthday cards for mom, dad, sisters, spouses, sons-in-law, nieces and so many other relationships. Any card will let the birthday boy or girl know you're thinking of them. Even if you live hundreds of miles away, try our Sign & Send service to have a handwritten signature added to any birthday card and mailed for you. If you need a little inspiration to get started, read some tips from Hallmark writers for what to say in a birthday card.
By the 1850s, the greeting card had been transformed from a relatively expensive, handmade and hand-delivered gift to a popular and affordable means of personal communication, due largely to advances in printing, mechanization, and a reduction in postal rates with the introduction of the postage stamp.[4] This was followed by new trends like Christmas cards, the first of which appeared in published form in London in 1843 when Sir Henry Cole hired artist John Calcott Horsley to design a holiday card that he could send to his friends and acquaintances. In the 1860s, companies like Marcus Ward & Co, Goodall and Charles Bennett began the mass production of greeting cards. They employed well known artists such as Kate Greenaway and Walter Crane as illustrators and card designers. The extensive Laura Seddon Greeting Card Collection from the Manchester Metropolitan University gathers 32,000 Victorian and Edwardian greeting cards and 450 Valentine's Day cards dating from the early nineteenth century, printed by the major publishers of the day.[5]
In the 1970s, Recycled Paper Greetings, a small company needing to establish a competing identity against the large companies like Hallmark Cards, began publishing humorous, whimsical card designs with the artist's name credited on the back. This was away from what was known as the standard look (sometimes called the Hallmark look.)[citation needed] By the 1980s, there was a thriving market for what were now called "alternative" greeting cards, and the name stuck even though these "alternative" cards changed the look of the entire industry.
These are greeting cards for the budget conscious. There are two common formats for reusable cards. Firstly, there are cards with slits in them positioned to hold pages. Secondly, there are notepad style cards where pages stick to the back of the cards. The pages that have been used for reusable cards can be removed after being received and fresh pages can be used to reuse the cards.
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